Kerri Sorrell

Kerri Sorrell

Kerri Sorrell is the Communications Specialist at Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation.

Blog posts by this Author:

  • Trusting the formula

    How will the nearly $180 million generated by the Natural Resources and Outdoor Recreation Trust Fund be spent in Iowa? INHF examines what that funding looks like on the ground.

  • Start 2017 off right with Iowa's First Day Hikes

    Start the new year on the right foot: Iowa State Parks is sponsoring free, guided hikes in 26 state parks and natural areas on New Year's Day as part of America's State Parks First Day Hikes initiative.

  • Celebrate Iowa Prairie Heritage Week across the state

    Iowa Prairie Heritage Week is an annual, week-long celebration of Iowa's prairie past, present and future. This year, events all across the state will be held Sept. 13-19. IPHW provides Iowans and visitors the chance to experience the prairie in its September beauty. Events—like prairie walks, seed harvests and educational tours—are scheduled at prairies in all of Iowa's regions; participants are also encouraged to organize events of their own, introducing friends and family to diverse prairie

  • INHF-sponsored “Mysteries of the Driftless” documentary to be shown at Oneota Film Festival

    Get in the film mindset before Sunday's Academy Awards by heading over to the Oneota Film Festival in Decorah this weekend. The festival runs from Friday through Sunday and will showcase a variety of films, including the  Mysteries of the Driftless  documentary , funded in part by the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation. Mysteries of the Driftless  features a team of explorers and scientists as they search for answers about the Driftless Area of northeast Iowa and bordering areas of Minnes

  • Nature Walk: Bird Insulation

    Survival for birds in winter is about feather design, grooming, available flood supplies, fat reserves and protection from wind. Feathers are a bird's first and most important defense against cold. Birds groom contour feathers with oil to make them water resistant. Beneath this outer covering, down feathers trap air and provide a critical insulation barrier. One can see this cardinal has fluffed its feathers, which increases the dead air space and their potential to insulate. How are you stay

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